Building Mountains: First Solo Show of Minjung Kim

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Building Mountains, Minjung Kim’s first Solo Show in New York, opening on 2 February, 2017 and on view through 11 March, 2017.

The work of Kim demonstrates her foundation in the traditional Korean calligraphic arts as well as the influence of mid-20th Century abstract expressionism, both of which celebrate the ability to convey energy and spirit through the manipulation of line and practiced spontaneity. Her artworks make use of small torn pieces of HaKimMinjung-Building Forest15_19, 165x130cm,2015.JPGnji, a traditional handmade paper from Korea, as well as ink and paint in a sculptural capacity creating the illusion of dimensionality, geometric form, and architectural minimalism.

Her work explores the expressive potential of pure material. The tone of her work is often at once contemplative and whimsical, ethereal and scientific. It moves onlookers to consider man’s place in nature and our relationships to each other.

She is hesitant to label her work as art — rather she describes her practice as a “discipline of life,” a meditative process which simultaneously requires her to focus her energy and to clear her mind.

Kim obtained her MFA and PhD at Seoul National University. She has been widely exhibited with exhibitions at such prestigious institutions as Danwon Museum of Art, Shangshang Museum of Art, Seoul Art Center, Bunan Museum of Art, Namsong Museum of Art, and Hanwan Museum of Art. She has won countless awards and honors including the 2004 Dong-A Art Prize, 20th Kyungin Great Art Prize, and the 7th Nahyseuk Women Art Prize. She currently lives and works in Korea.

Suh Jeong Min: Solo show

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present The Word of Prayer, the gallery’s third solo exhibition featuring works by Korean artist Suh Jeong Min.

Suh’s work presents a rich and traditional subject matter with sleek geometric designs and flowing rhythmic patterns. His process begins by collecting handmade Hanji paper from Buddhist temples and traditional calligraphists’ studios; the latter a source of discarded works and sketches, and the former a home of prayers that were written and deposited. After collecting the paper, Suh glues and rolls the Hanji and carefully mounts hundreds of rolls on a handmade wooden board and frame.

By bearing evidence to the ink applied by past owners, the paper exists in two worlds; they pay homage to their previous life as prayers and calligraphy–orienting viewers to Suh’s cultural background, while simultaneously telling the stories that Suh positions them to tell.

Suh Jeong Min’s subject matter ranges from spirituality to depictions of Korean architecture and ephemeral sensations. In all that they depict, the content of the work is rooted in a cultural and religious framework which reflects the contemporary thinker’s reverence for the past.

This will be Suh’s first solo show in the USA. The artist lives and works in Seoul, Korea.