Artist Call For Entry | Naked! What’s nu(de) in contemporary art?

Important dates

The next group Fresh! exhibition will take place January 17th – February 2nd 2019.

We are accepting artists to submit their work for consideration until December 15th 2018.
To apply, please fill out the application form. Fees apply. 

Who can apply?

Artists working in any genre, material can apply, including works on canvas, photography, paper, mixed media, sculpture.  We are unable to show video or performance art.
Only artworks created the last three years will be considered.

Curatorial theme

The figure, specifically the nude, is arguably the most widely used subject matter in the history of art. From the Venus of Willendorf and Ancient Greece to Picasso and Giacometti, the nude figure has been used formally and conceptually to represent not only the model, but the emotions and ideals of their times and places. In this global world, what does it mean to use the nude in our modern age, particularly with the advent of new materials and technologies, both in the creation and spread of the artwork. How has the tradition carried over, and how has it changed to reflect our society?

Historically the nude was viewed in a more “heroic” fashion; from Antiquity to the Renaissance, while there were female nudes, the male nude dominated. There begins a shift in the 1600s and by the turn of the 19th century the landscape of nudes are almost entirely women, a lineage that we are still following today. What is it about the shift in modernity that has shifted the idea of the nude from “heroism” to “vulnerability” or simply more blatant “objectification”.

Viewing these artworks allows us a lens with which to see how each culture interprets beauty differently. From the Reubeneque figures to the airbrushed and photoshopped images we see today, how can the way we deal with the figure show us what our modern conceptions of beauty tell us about ourselves? How do the physical characteristics of the human body define a societies’ values? What are the values that society deems important enough to put into art?

ITOMARISM : Kaleidoscope

Mari Ito SOLO SHOW: ITOMARISM Kaleidoscope Oct. 18 –Dec. 1, 2018

Opening Reception Thurs. Oct. 18, 2018. The artist is present.

For press inquiries or general information: admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

Mari Ito. Untitled, 2018. Natural pigments on Japanese rice paper. 39×39 inches/100x100CM

September 28, 2018 (New York, NY) – JanKossen Contemporary is proud to present ITOMARISM:Kaleidoscope, the premiere solo show in the United States by Japanese contemporary artist Mari Ito. The exhibition will be held in New York from Oct. 18th to Dec. 1st 2018. The artist shall be present at the opening reception on Thursday, 18th Oct. between 6 – 8 pm.

Mari Ito (Tokyo, 1980, lives in Barcelona SPAIN), studied traditional Japanese painting at Joshibi University of Art and Design in Tokyo. Mari Ito’s oeuvre is based and influenced by the philosophical approaches found in Animism, Anthropocene and Animalism.

Animism finds its expression in long standing Japanese techniques where all objects, places and creatures are seen to have a spiritual existence, and are hence animated and alive. Ito’s work shows us her world that is post-human existence: when we are no longer an influential force on the environment. Her organic, alien plants affected by a nuclear disaster thrive and grow, despite humanity’s absence (or because of it).

Ito’s new work is a continuation her series entitled “The origin of Desire”, where the artist invites us to reflect on the origins of our needs; that is our most irrational and personal impulses. The Id or “das Es” (as Sigmund Freud would say) split off from the ego and the superego is the psychic – therefore the purest and most primitive expression of our drives and aspirations. The essence of what makes us “alive”.

Completely opposed forces that actually complement and react to one another are interpreted by Ito in the same way, for they have the same value and form a duality that exists in natural harmony. The Romantics pioneered the concept of the sublime, of humanity needing to succumb to the awesome force of nature, normally shown with a small figure or a person with their back turned towards the viewer, engulfed by their environment. Ito has completely excluded the figure, leaving only a representation of our base desires through personified flora.

Ito’s delicately formed creations come to life as they unfold into themselves, permanently striving to make their way towards awareness in their on-going search for the root of desire;

whatever its nature.

Mari Ito. Untitled, 2018. Natural pigments on Japanese rice paper. 38x51inches/97x130cm

About JanKossen Contemporary

JanKossen Contemporary, founded in 2009, is an international contemporary art gallery representing artists working across multiple disciplines. Its principal focus is working with artists from various countries whose diverse practices include painting, drawing, sculpture, and large scale installation. The gallery has exhibitions in New York and administration HQ in Basel, Switzerland.

FRESH! 2018 “ORDER AND CHAOS: THE WORLD OF THE ENLIGHTENED”

The annual summer group show FRESH! returns to JanKossen Contemporary, featuring works by 13 artists under the curatorial vision of “Order and Chaos: the World of the Enlightened”.

Artists have always played a role in voicing how the world is seen; they are critics disecting the concepts aesthetics, ideals of beauty, rationalism, tolerance and liberty. How do our artists see the world today? And what can we learn from their viewpoints ?

Artists were invited to explore and present their world viewpoints; to re-interpret what is considered truth (or not)and the realities around us. A diverse group of international emerging and established artists were selected, offering the viewers a range of distinct methods, media, materials and techniques.

Selected artists include Atsuko Chirikjian (USA), Eva Breitfuß (DE), Jarek Puczel (PL), Julie Rotblatt (USA), Leonid Filitsyan (USA), Matthew Mogle (USA),Michael Gatzke (DE), Michele Utley- Voigt (USA), Ryan Burns (USA), Soojin Choi (USA), Vanessa Kocking (USA), Ahron Weiner (USA), Mariela Lechin (USA)  and Trey Abdella(USA).

Abstraction has a strong presence in this show. Artists Vanessa Kocking, Eva Breitfuß, Julie Rotblatt, Mariela Lechin and Ryan Burns use various media to create landscapes and explore both espiritual and physical elements of the today’s world. While Kocking creates an alternative space to reality building silent landscapes and characters emerging from experience, fantasy and an eternal existential pursuit; Breitfuß’ central concern is to understand, explore, transform and transport realities and energies of time, space and nature through art. While Burns’ artistic practice investigates society’s relationship with the natural world and climate change; Rotblatt works with various media with the aim to explore multiple dimensions of both the spiritual and physical withing the mind-body connection. In a world that constantly attempts to choose between extremes, Lechin paintings reflect the idea that contradictions coexist harmoniously as one.

Artists Leonid Filitsyan, Michele Utley- Voigt, Matthew Mogle explore the human condition in relation to personal experiences, emotion, fate and form. Utley- Voigt’s powerful paintings is a visulisation of our complex sense of self, which she translates into a claidascope using complex and intelligent technique of multiple layerered imagery. Mogle romanticizes narratives of the past, fused with his cynical and melancholic views of the present to explore the effects of chronic Lyme disease on the artist´s body. By contrast, the sculptor Leonid Filitsyan transforms and reforms what is given as the human form offering a new perspective of interpretation.

Jarek Puczel and Sooji Choi introduce a strong psychological component in their artwork creating ambiguous moments of dimensional perception. Puczel has a emotional but calming style reduced in shaped in color. Choi plays with the true character of objects, exploring its instability, its errors, or by being dismantled.

As artists of the 21st century Mitchel Gatzke,  Ahron Weiner and Trey Abdella analise society current issues. Using a monochromatic palette, the viewer is invited to participate in Gatzke’s atmospheric scenes; while Weiner uses newspaper and journalistic media as a medium to reflect and open a window into our collective consciousness. Conjoining relism and cartoons, Abdella creates cohesive scenes where cartoons are real and reality is distorted; offering us both an amusing yet disturbing interpretation of what is ailing in our society today.

Paying homage to cultural heritage, Atsuko Chirikjian works are steeped in tradition with a background working in materials. A canvas is for Chirikjian a three-dimensional construct; building her own canvas through the layering materials such as thread, wire, net, bamboo, twigs, and cheesecloth.

MONOCHROME

Monochrome, a curated group exhibition showcasing selected artists from JanKossen Contemporary’s international program, will be on view from May 31 – July 14, 2018 with an opening reception from 6-8pm on May 31, 2018. The exhibition will feature artworks by Troy Simmons (USA), Dieter Kränzlein (Germany), Antonio Marra (Italy), Park Byung-Hoon (South Korean/France), Alex Rane (USA/Italy), Hannah Quinlivan (Australia), and Ye Jin-Young (South Korea) which explore the concept of monochromatic abstract art. An online catalogue will accompany the exhibition.TroySimmons_Evolve_2016_JanKossen

Troy Simmons. Evolve, 2016. Concrete, aluminum, acrylic. 60x36x18 inchesMonochromatic art has expanded since its inception in the early 20th century painting. The exploration of value and tonal changes are used to convey a wide variety of emotions and meaning today. Beginning in Moscow with Russian Suprematist artist Kazimir Malevich with his Black Square on a White Field (1915), monochromatic art works have seen a rapid growth, particularly in New York with the likes of abstract expressionists such as Ad Reinhardt in the 50s, to minimalism with artists such as Agnes Martin and Frank Stella in the 60s. Monochrome continues this tradition and pushes the boundaries of not only the physical materials used, but the range of emotions that they are able to express.

HannahQuinlivan_It started with a spark, 2017. 35x46x7in_88x116x18cm. LED light and anodised aluminium.

Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with a Spark, 2017. LED light and anodized aluminum. 60x36x18 inches

The abstraction of form, however, does not equal a simplification of thought. By removing the chromatic range of an object, the artist encourages the viewer to fully absorb the subtle nuances in surface texture and shade, as seen in Troy Simmons’ mixed media works, as well as Alex Rane and Dieter Kränzlein’s marble sculptures. Even comparing two monochromatic abstracted sculptures, the viewer is presented with two radically different works, from the geometric abstractions of Kränzlein to the surreal abstracted figures of Alex Rane. Without the distraction of colors, viewers are also able to see the subtle surface quality as well as the artists’ application and control of materials. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly colored geometric works, Antonio Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of unexpected color in an otherwise monochromatic piece.

Black and white are not true colors, but shades meant to distinguish tonal value. Traditionally these shades were made by using paint. However, even this aspect is expanded in “Monochrome” group show. Instead of mixing paints, Hannah Quinlivan employs LEDs to create shades generating through the interaction between lights and shadows. Troy Simmons and Ye Jin-young put a stronger emphasis on what can be seen from the expressive, energetic shapes to the delicate, hand-pulled clay petals.

For press inquiries or general information, please contact the gallery office at admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

Whispering Tranquility: Minimalist Seascape by Kim Yeong-Jea

April 3, 2018 (New York, NY) – JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Whispering Tranquility, a solo exhibition by South Korean photographer Kim Yeong- Jea. This exhibition will herald JanKossen Contemporary’s new exploration into photography as well as digital media. The show will be on view from April 26 – May 26, 2018 with an opening reception from 6-8pm on April 26.

Unlike Hiroshi Sugimoto who dignifies the sea as an integrate, transcendental being through a distant, primitive eye, Kim Yeong-Jea roams at the interface of evolving humanity and eternal nature. At the age of sixty-seven, Kim left home and traveled over a hundred times on the seventh national highway along the east coast of South Korea. Through the camera, Kim turns the seashore into an intimate shrine where he meditates tranquility by compressing numerous busy, ephemeral life moments into one large format image.

Tides smooth sharp edges of stones; waves crash on reefs. The seashore seems often associated with tension. However, by applying long-exposure technique, Kim Yeong-Jea transforms the dynamic sea waves into airy, pervading flows. Layers of overlapping moments resemble the accumulation of memory, which eventually reach a calm, introspective status. The sea is no longer a powerful, solemn alien indifferent to human beings, but an embodiment of mind. In Kim’s works, the sea became a metaphor of spiritual placidity which gradually emerges out of endless, energetic flows. Every single struggle adds weight and meaning to one’s life and leads the person to approach inner peace.

Kim Yeongjea_Typhoon_2013

Kim Yeong-Jea. Typhoon, 2013. Edition 1/3, photograph on Hahnamühle paper, 91 x 32 inches.

Kim’s seascape is an extending tunnel to a world where one could share the quiet, slow spiritual progress with the artist. The boundary between the sea and sky in Kim’s works is gently blurred and blended through over-exposure. The depth of field is flattened, which brings the primary focus to the repetitive geometric forms of fishery and reefs in the foreground. The subtle variation of lines and blocks triggers lively whispers in the environment, gradually soothing viewers’ mind. As going further to the vanish point, one immerses him or herself into the misty, vast negative space of the flowing sea and empty sky. In this melting, serene visual journey, one may start wondering like Kim Yeong-Jea did before: are our memory and life experience becoming hazy or sublimating into something else like the serene nature?

Kim Yeongjea_Early morming mist 2 2017_20M.jpg

Kim Yeong-Jea. Early Morning Mist 2, 2017. Edition 1/3, photograph on Hahnamühle paper, 52 x 32 inches.

About Kim Yeong-Jea

With thirty-seven-year experience in mastering camera, Kim Yeong-Jea has been experimenting with landscape photography. Kim began his fine art photography practices in the 1990s. His works have been included in major Korean and international exhibitions, such as Jangteo Photo Show at Sejong Center, International Photo Festival in Seoul, South Korea, and the 57th Venice Biennale. Kim is a member of The Photo Artist Society of Korea. He currently lives and works near Seoul, South Korea.

For press inquiries or general information, please contact the gallery office at admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

 

impulses, restraints, tones: New Compositions by Hannah Quinlivan

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present impulses, restraints, tones an exhibition by Australian contemporary artist, Hannah Quinlivan. impulses, restraints, tones is the artist’s first exhibition in New York and will be on view from March 1 – April 20, 2018 with an opening reception on March 1 from 6-8pm.

 

Hannah Quinlivan. Holdfast, 2017. Steel and PVC, 185 x 75 x8 inches.

Best known for her work within the movement of experimental drawing, Quinlivan expands upon the medium to create drawings that employ wire, steel, salt, yarn, shadow, and LED light, constantly evolving and dissecting the elements of a drawing to investigate the confines of the line itself. Twisted wire structures are the basis for her shadow drawings, which Quinlivan later develops further into sculptures; 2D drawings turn into 3D drawings, that are then turned back into 2D drawings. With a deep commitment to the exploration of and innate response to her materials, Quinlivan composes lyrical artworks that stitch together a response to the passing of time. Each element of the work is endlessly translated into an infinite looping web; traveling through our consciousness and drawing attention to the subjectivity of the phenomena of recollection and forgetting.

Hannah Quinlivan. Swallowed by the Sky, 2017. Acrylic and Indian ink on linen, 83 x 73 inches.

impulses, restraints, tones exhibits brand new “Spatial Drawings,” as well as two delicate, yet powerful, site-specific and interactive installations that respond to the gallery space and flux of bodies within it. The well-known “Spatial Drawings” walk the line between sculptural weaving and graphic mark making and explores concepts of temporal reality and memory. Quinlivan’s “Spatial Drawings” performance develops from wire armatures suspended from the ceiling. The shadows of these wire armatures are the basis for Quinlivan’s live and in-person crystalline salt drawings that will be developed over the course of three weeks during exhibition. This work, shown for the first time in New York City, forms part of a series of site-specific ephemeral drawings Quinlivan has been making in Cambridge, Berlin, Hong Kong, Australia, and Colorado from since 2016.

Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with A Spark, 2017. LED light and anodised aluminium, 35 x 46 x 7 inches.

Curator Marguerite Brown, explains “Linear threads and their manipulation have for millennia been symbolically connected to notions of time. The Moirai of ancient Greek mythology, also known at the Fates, were three goddesses who through the act of spinning thread with distaff and spindle, controlled the life of every person from birth to death, when their thread was abruptly cut. Similar female deities exist in Roman, Norse and Slavic mythologies, where thread is consistently wielded as a manifestation of destiny. As such, a simple strand and the way it is stretched, allotted and truncated, became an ancient way of comprehending the movement of a human life through time.”
ABOUT HANNAH QUINLIVAN
Hannah Quinlivan, named by BMA Magazine as one of the Six Canberra Artists to watch in 2018, was a finalist for the 2014 Alice Prize and has received such prestigious accolades as the Canberra Critic Circle Award, Shire of East Pilbara Residency Award, Cox Prize, Don Moffat & Cecilia Ng award, People’s Choice Award, Megalo Print Studio and Gallery Residency Award, and the Jan Brown Drawing Prize. She has exhibited major presentations at Canberra Museum and Art Gallery, Canberra; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Cambridge University, London, Pembroke College, Cambridge; Deakin University, Melbourne; The Hong Kong Harbourfront, Hong Kong; and Kuala Lumpur Biennale, National Art Gallery of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. She is in such prestigious public collections as National Gallery of Australia, Gregory Allicar Museum, The Australian High Commission (Singapore), Philip Cox Collection, Deakin University, The Australian National University, KPMG Art Collection, Gaw Capital collection, Colorado State University, Megalo Print Studio + Gallery, Shire of East Pilbara, Ormond College Collection. She was recently selected by the curators of Urban Art Projects to create a major public art commission where her work will be featured on the glazed screen of every platform of the Canberra Light Rail network.

UnBreakable – Ceramics Redefined

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present UNBREAKABLE: CERAMICS REDEFINED, an exhibition of figurative and figurative abstract contemporary ceramics with work by Penny Byrne, Kathy Stecko, Claire Curneen, Cathy Lewis, and Keun Woo Lee.

The connotations surrounding the medium of ceramic have historically been associated with concepts of craft and vessel. This exhibition however, brings together five contemporary artists who break down these confines to create haunting, political, religious, and poignant sculptures. Their historical consequences, contemporary conceptualism and social relevance, adhere to and break historical molds of craft while standing on the forefront of trends in contemporary sculpture.

Australian artist Penny Byrne’s sculptural works are politically charged, highly engaging and often disarmingly humorous. Using materials such as porcelain figurines, bronze, glass, vintage and found objects, Byrne’s work presents an ongoing inquiry into popular culture and international politics. Though the themes of her work are dark and heavy, the lightness and treatment of the porcelain contrasts this, formulating a new perception of these themes.

P.Byrne.Putins Poodle.2017_13x4x4in view 2 low res

Penny Byrne. Putin’s Poodle, 2017. Trump bobble head, antique porcelain figurine, epoxy resin, enamel paints, 13 x 4 x 4 inches.

Kathy Stecko’s humanoid porcelain sculptures resemble a party thrown at a haunted circus.  The elongated yet truncated limbs recall elements of 16th century mannerism, while the bulging bellies and hallow eyes resemble the psychological undertones of an Edvard Munch. These tiny sculptures hang on the wall or stand on their own pedestals to create tiny clusters of figures both affecting and endearing. Stecko lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

KathyStecko_Fracture_2017_14.5x3.5x3in_porcelain

Kathy Stecko. Fracture, 2017. Porcelain, 14.5 x 3.5 x 3 inches.

UK-based artist Claire Curneen’s androgynous figures have always been a convergence of art history, ceramic history, and religious symbolism. Her single standing modeled figures, serve as a developed response to traditional ceramic objects such as the standing Vase, however draw upon medieval and renaissance approaches to depicting the human figure in painting. Often also referencing Medici Blue, Dutch pottery, or Japanese ceramics in her work, you will also often find gold fingers and lips recalling the important Japanese tradition of Kintsugi – the art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum. Taking one step further, Curneen often comments on religious concerns such as symbolic references to Christ, biblical interpretations, concepts of soul, and questions of mortality.

Claire Curneen_Untitled 1 (Bird Figure) _2017_28.25x8.75x8in detail 2

Claire Curneen. Untitled 1 (Bird Figure), 2017. Ceramic, 28.25 x 8.75 x 8 inches.

Cathy Lewis, trained at the Glasgow School of Art, Falmouth School of Art and The University of the West of England, is most known for her beautifully modelled life-sized figures of children with strong urban or tribal identities. Her work is concerned with ideas about culture, social history and self, and she often combines several ideas into one piece each influencing each other and asking and answering questions. Lewis’ work examines the importance of a cultural heritage and how this may be learnt and shared. Encouraging her audience to examine links between the past and the future, her works call into question how the future is consistently propped up by the past.

JanKossen ContemporaryUnBreakable - Ceramics RedefinedJanuary 11, 2018

Cathy Lewis. Mainly Porcelain I (Left) and Mainly Porcelain II (Right), 2017. Ceramic, 47 x 14 x 6.5 inches.

Figurative abstraction is courted, yet ultimately tempered in the work of Keun Woo Lee. Traces of plants, flowers, and other elemental features of landscape remain visible in Lee’s creations. These forms, however, serve as a mere framework for the “nothingness” that holds the artist’s true interest. Lee has developed a keen sensitivity for the exploration of absence’s impact on depth, successfully immersing the viewer’s attention in the concave reductions of the final image. Keun Woo Lee was born in Korea and currently lives and works in Kiel, Germany.

Keun Woo Lee. Wave Series, 2015-2017. Glazed stoneware.

For questions or more information, please contact Karen Gilbert at Karen.gilbert@jankossen.com or at 631-903-5564.

YE JIN YOUNG “WAVES AND WINDS”

Ye Jin-Young, Wind. I feel a space of mind VIII, 2017. 78.7 x 47.2 in, Clay and mixed material.

Ye Jin-Young is inspired by the concept of a ‘life force’ or ‘energy flow’, otherwise known as Qi. He creates his works by way of intuition, tracing memory and his own stream of consciousness to develop delicate, swirling patterns reminiscent of those found in the natural environment. The gentle repetition conceives a sense of spirituality as Jin-Young conjures landscapes of petals that seem otherworldly and yet comforting.

Jin-Young works to convey nature’s wondrous yet simple patterns in an equally delicate means by gently pulling and molding by hand, most often, virgin porcelain petal-like elements until they form a flowing piece of tapestry like wall art. Using the themes of wind, flower and water waves as focal point, he forces viewers to move with his works.

Bruno Walpoth “Insight”

BRUNO Walpoth, The Seeker (left) and The Timid One (right)

Bruno Walpoth is an Italian sculptor who’s wooden, cardboard, and bronze sculptures are caught in a moment — stagnant, while also exposed and carrying the impression of vulnerability. His sculptures are honest in appearance, silently asserting their presence and commanding the space around them. Though paralyzed, these forms continue to build on the meditative tone of the exhibition, immersing the observer in a sensitive encounter.

Bruno Walpoth “Insight”

Bruno Walpoth “Insight” and Ye Jin Young “Waves and Winds”

Bruno Walpoth is an Italian sculptor who’s wooden, cardboard, and bronze sculptures are caught in a moment — stagnant, while also exposed and carrying the impression of vulnerability. His sculptures are honest in appearance, silently asserting their presence and commanding the space around them. Though paralyzed, these forms continue to build on the meditative tone of the exhibition, immersing the observer in a sensitive encounter.

Walpoth’s works range in medium from clay to bronze, but he shows a fondness for working with wood. His use of carving tools to carefully perfect details on such a delicate medium provide his sculptures with the appearance of skin-like properties.