FRESH! 2018 “ORDER AND CHAOS: THE WORLD OF THE ENLIGHTENED”

The annual summer group show FRESH! returns to JanKossen Contemporary, featuring works by 13 artists under the curatorial vision of “Order and Chaos: the World of the Enlightened”.

Artists have always played a role in voicing how the world is seen; they are critics disecting the concepts aesthetics, ideals of beauty, rationalism, tolerance and liberty. How do our artists see the world today? And what can we learn from their viewpoints ?

Artists were invited to explore and present their world viewpoints; to re-interpret what is considered truth (or not)and the realities around us. A diverse group of international emerging and established artists were selected, offering the viewers a range of distinct methods, media, materials and techniques.

Selected artists include Atsuko Chirikjian (USA), Eva Breitfuß (DE), Jarek Puczel (PL), Julie Rotblatt (USA), Leonid Filitsyan (USA), Matthew Mogle (USA),Michael Gatzke (DE), Michele Utley- Voigt (USA), Ryan Burns (USA), Soojin Choi (USA), Vanessa Kocking (USA), Ahron Weiner (USA), Mariela Lechin (USA)  and Trey Abdella(USA).

Abstraction has a strong presence in this show. Artists Vanessa Kocking, Eva Breitfuß, Julie Rotblatt, Mariela Lechin and Ryan Burns use various media to create landscapes and explore both espiritual and physical elements of the today’s world. While Kocking creates an alternative space to reality building silent landscapes and characters emerging from experience, fantasy and an eternal existential pursuit; Breitfuß’ central concern is to understand, explore, transform and transport realities and energies of time, space and nature through art. While Burns’ artistic practice investigates society’s relationship with the natural world and climate change; Rotblatt works with various media with the aim to explore multiple dimensions of both the spiritual and physical withing the mind-body connection. In a world that constantly attempts to choose between extremes, Lechin paintings reflect the idea that contradictions coexist harmoniously as one.

Artists Leonid Filitsyan, Michele Utley- Voigt, Matthew Mogle explore the human condition in relation to personal experiences, emotion, fate and form. Utley- Voigt’s powerful paintings is a visulisation of our complex sense of self, which she translates into a claidascope using complex and intelligent technique of multiple layerered imagery. Mogle romanticizes narratives of the past, fused with his cynical and melancholic views of the present to explore the effects of chronic Lyme disease on the artist´s body. By contrast, the sculptor Leonid Filitsyan transforms and reforms what is given as the human form offering a new perspective of interpretation.

Jarek Puczel and Sooji Choi introduce a strong psychological component in their artwork creating ambiguous moments of dimensional perception. Puczel has a emotional but calming style reduced in shaped in color. Choi plays with the true character of objects, exploring its instability, its errors, or by being dismantled.

As artists of the 21st century Mitchel Gatzke,  Ahron Weiner and Trey Abdella analise society current issues. Using a monochromatic palette, the viewer is invited to participate in Gatzke’s atmospheric scenes; while Weiner uses newspaper and journalistic media as a medium to reflect and open a window into our collective consciousness. Conjoining relism and cartoons, Abdella creates cohesive scenes where cartoons are real and reality is distorted; offering us both an amusing yet disturbing interpretation of what is ailing in our society today.

Paying homage to cultural heritage, Atsuko Chirikjian works are steeped in tradition with a background working in materials. A canvas is for Chirikjian a three-dimensional construct; building her own canvas through the layering materials such as thread, wire, net, bamboo, twigs, and cheesecloth.

FRESH! 3rd Annual Summer Show “GEOFORM”

New York, NY. JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present FRESH! 3rd Annual Summer Show: GEOFORM, a group show in collaboration with Arte Ponte Cultural Institute, featuring works by 26 artists demonstrating their interpretations of geometric abstraction.

GEOFORM is a mixed-media show where visitors are invited to participate in uniquely constructed realities composed by a diverse group of international emerging artists. The exhibition highlights the potential of geometric forms; it is through the combination of pure shape and structure that reality is decoded and the audience is introduced to an intensely raw experience.

Exhibited artists include

Guang Zhu | Brooklyn, NY Patti Samper | Montclair, NJ Stacy Lovejoy | Portland, OR Larry Jones | Terre Haute, IN Ryota Matsumoto | Tokyo, Japan Danielle Feldhaker | Tel Aviv, Israel Sabre Esler | Atlanta, GA John Wilson | Manteo, NC Sean Mick | Jamaica Plain, MA Atsuko Okamoto | Boynton Beach, FL Jackie Tufford | Jupiter, FL George Goodridge | Miami Beach, FL Myoung Su (Sienna) Ko | Providence, RI Blair Martin Cahill | Ojai, CA Jon Merritt | Newburyport, MA April Hammock | Baton Rouge, LA Lisa Fromartz | New York, NY  Kyle Yip | Toronto, ON Monica Delgado | New York, NY Amy Chan | Henrico, VA Jane Lincoln | East Falmouth, MA Blaine Breaux | River Ridge, LA Russell Bellamy | Leesburg, FL Roberta Estes | Seneca Falls, NY Sharmen Liao | Los Angeles, CA Clark Rendall | Brooklyn, NY

Through the works of Danielle Feldhaker and April Hammock, visitors are introduced to the foundations of the genre; both artists reference the styles of Mondrian, Kandinsky, and other abstractionists, while bringing something uniquely theirs as demonstrated by individual varying combinations of form and colour.

Guang Zhu celebrates the beauty of non-objective form by taking a mathematical approach to his work. There is a sense of satisfaction from her organized process, a characteristic also shared by Patti Samper, who captures orderly delight through the simplicity and minimalism of her shapes. Similarly, Sabre Esler’s works are methodically calculated; her patterns are developed logically while also managing to establish a human connection.

There is an added complexity to the works of Larry Jones, Stacy Lovejoy, and Jackie Tufford, as their compositions are emotionally charged. From Jones’s tightly coiled sculptures, to the regal nostalgia of Tufford’s stained glass, to the celebration of childhood in Lovejoy’s works, each artist coerces a different, and yet equally powerful visceral response.

Although chaotic in nature, the works of Ryota Matsumoto, Blaine Breaux, Kyle Yip, and Sharmen Liao, are likewise commanding. The shapes in their works permeate the space, establishing relationships that are simultaneously tumultuous and harmonious. This dichotomy is further illustrated by Atsuko Okamoto and Myoung Su (Sienna) Ko, who find peace by injecting tension. They guide viewers through a balancing act of contrasting elements; from cool and warm tones to the dual experience of movement and stability.

Viewers are exposed to a delicate vulnerability in the works of Blair Martin Cahill, Lisa Fromartz, Monica Delgado, and Russell Bellamy. Each artist redefines perception and creates depth and meaning through layers. Meaning is derived from the relationship between each layer, and audiences are moved towards self-reflection as they consider the juxtaposition of seemingly contradictory elements.

That correspondence between visitor and artwork is further accentuated by George Goodridge, Jon Merritt, Amy Chan  and Jane Lincoln. The audience is present as they participate in an organic dialogue between space and work. The dimensionality of their works reach out and communicates with viewers, pressing for interaction and seeking to be given meaning.

Much like Rosecrans, John Wilson’s work holds architectural elements. Influenced by his background in architecture, Wilson’s art provides structure and shape without instruction; simply permitting the non-objective to exist.

The works of Sean Mick and Roberta Estes exhibit the spirit of geometric abstraction as expressed by Mick, who describes his work as ‘reductive visual language.’ Clark Rendall, whose works are inspired by bodies of water, also embodies this essence of deconstructing, allowing the audience freedom over meaning.

It is through the mastering the genre of geometric abstraction, that these artists create a pure concept that challenges perception and redefines reality.

The exhibition opens on Thursday, July 13th, 2017, and will remain on view through August 18th, 2017.