MONOCHROME

Monochrome, a curated group exhibition showcasing selected artists from JanKossen Contemporary’s international program, will be on view from May 31 – July 14, 2018 with an opening reception from 6-8pm on May 31, 2018. The exhibition will feature artworks by Troy Simmons (USA), Dieter Kränzlein (Germany), Antonio Marra (Italy), Park Byung-Hoon (South Korean/France), Alex Rane (USA/Italy), Hannah Quinlivan (Australia), and Ye Jin-Young (South Korea) which explore the concept of monochromatic abstract art. An online catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

TroySimmons_Evolve_2016_JanKossen
Troy Simmons. Evolve, 2016. Concrete, aluminum, acrylic. 60x36x18 inches

Monochromatic art has expanded since its inception in the early 20th century painting. The exploration of value and tonal changes are used to convey a wide variety of emotions and meaning today. Beginning in Moscow with Russian Suprematist artist Kazimir Malevich with his Black Square on a White Field (1915), monochromatic art works have seen a rapid growth, particularly in New York with the likes of abstract expressionists such as Ad Reinhardt in the 50s, to minimalism with artists such as Agnes Martin and Frank Stella in the 60s. Monochrome continues this tradition and pushes the boundaries of not only the physical materials used, but the range of emotions that they are able to express.

HannahQuinlivan_It started with a spark, 2017. 35x46x7in_88x116x18cm. LED light and anodised aluminium.
Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with a Spark, 2017. LED light and anodized aluminum. 60x36x18 inches

The abstraction of form, however, does not equal a simplification of thought. By removing the chromatic range of an object, the artist encourages the viewer to fully absorb the subtle nuances in surface texture and shade, as seen in Troy Simmons’ mixed media works, as well as Alex Rane and Dieter Kränzlein’s marble sculptures. Even comparing two monochromatic abstracted sculptures, the viewer is presented with two radically different works, from the geometric abstractions of Kränzlein to the surreal abstracted figures of Alex Rane. Without the distraction of colors, viewers are also able to see the subtle surface quality as well as the artists’ application and control of materials. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly colored geometric works, Antonio Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of unexpected color in an otherwise monochromatic piece.

Black and white are not true colors, but shades meant to distinguish tonal value. Traditionally these shades were made by using paint. However, even this aspect is expanded in “Monochrome” group show. Instead of mixing paints, Hannah Quinlivan employs LEDs to create shades generating through the interaction between lights and shadows. Troy Simmons and Ye Jin-young put a stronger emphasis on what can be seen from the expressive, energetic shapes to the delicate, hand-pulled clay petals.

For press inquiries or general information, please contact the gallery office at admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

YE JIN YOUNG “WAVES AND WINDS”

Ye Jin-Young, Wind. I feel a space of mind VIII, 2017. 78.7 x 47.2 in, Clay and mixed material.

Ye Jin-Young is inspired by the concept of a ‘life force’ or ‘energy flow’, otherwise known as Qi. He creates his works by way of intuition, tracing memory and his own stream of consciousness to develop delicate, swirling patterns reminiscent of those found in the natural environment. The gentle repetition conceives a sense of spirituality as Jin-Young conjures landscapes of petals that seem otherworldly and yet comforting.

Detail shot of Wind. I feel a space of mind VIII.

Jin-Young works to convey nature’s wondrous yet simple patterns in an equally delicate means by gently pulling and molding by hand, most often, virgin porcelain petal-like elements until they form a flowing piece of tapestry like wall art. Using the themes of wind, flower and water waves as focal point, he forces viewers to move with his works.

Bruno Walpoth “Insight” and Ye Jin Young “Waves and Winds”

Bruno Walpoth “Insight” and Ye Jin Young “Waves and Winds”

Bruno Walpoth is an Italian sculptor who’s wooden, cardboard, and bronze sculptures are caught in a moment — stagnant, while also exposed and carrying the impression of vulnerability. His sculptures are honest in appearance, silently asserting their presence and commanding the space around them. Though paralyzed, these forms continue to build on the meditative tone of the exhibition, immersing the observer in a sensitive encounter.

In contrast to Walpoth’s motionless works, Ye Jin-Young is inspired by the concept of a ‘life force’ or ‘energy flow’, otherwise known as Qi. He creates his works by way of intuition, tracing memory and his own stream of consciousness to develop delicate, swirling patterns reminiscent of those found in the natural environment. The gentle repetition conceives a sense of spirituality as Jin-Young conjures landscapes of petals that seem otherworldly and yet comforting.

Though working with different mediums, the two exhibiting artists share in creating, not only an intimately meditative experience for the viewer, but in their creative process as well. Walpoth’s works range in medium from clay to bronze, but he shows a fondness for working with wood. His use of carving tools to carefully perfect details on such a delicate medium provide his sculptures with the appearance of skin-like properties. Jin-Young works to convey nature’s wondrous yet simple patterns in an equally delicate means by gently pulling and molding by hand, most often, virgin porcelain petal-like elements until they form a flowing piece of tapestry like wall art. Using the themes of wind, flower and water waves as focal point, he forces viewers to move with his works.