MONOCHROME

Monochrome, a curated group exhibition showcasing selected artists from JanKossen Contemporary’s international program, will be on view from May 31 – July 14, 2018 with an opening reception from 6-8pm on May 31, 2018. The exhibition will feature artworks by Troy Simmons (USA), Dieter Kränzlein (Germany), Antonio Marra (Italy), Park Byung-Hoon (South Korean/France), Alex Rane (USA/Italy), Hannah Quinlivan (Australia), and Ye Jin-Young (South Korea) which explore the concept of monochromatic abstract art. An online catalogue will accompany the exhibition.TroySimmons_Evolve_2016_JanKossen

Troy Simmons. Evolve, 2016. Concrete, aluminum, acrylic. 60x36x18 inchesMonochromatic art has expanded since its inception in the early 20th century painting. The exploration of value and tonal changes are used to convey a wide variety of emotions and meaning today. Beginning in Moscow with Russian Suprematist artist Kazimir Malevich with his Black Square on a White Field (1915), monochromatic art works have seen a rapid growth, particularly in New York with the likes of abstract expressionists such as Ad Reinhardt in the 50s, to minimalism with artists such as Agnes Martin and Frank Stella in the 60s. Monochrome continues this tradition and pushes the boundaries of not only the physical materials used, but the range of emotions that they are able to express.

HannahQuinlivan_It started with a spark, 2017. 35x46x7in_88x116x18cm. LED light and anodised aluminium.

Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with a Spark, 2017. LED light and anodized aluminum. 60x36x18 inches

The abstraction of form, however, does not equal a simplification of thought. By removing the chromatic range of an object, the artist encourages the viewer to fully absorb the subtle nuances in surface texture and shade, as seen in Troy Simmons’ mixed media works, as well as Alex Rane and Dieter Kränzlein’s marble sculptures. Even comparing two monochromatic abstracted sculptures, the viewer is presented with two radically different works, from the geometric abstractions of Kränzlein to the surreal abstracted figures of Alex Rane. Without the distraction of colors, viewers are also able to see the subtle surface quality as well as the artists’ application and control of materials. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly colored geometric works, Antonio Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of unexpected color in an otherwise monochromatic piece.

Black and white are not true colors, but shades meant to distinguish tonal value. Traditionally these shades were made by using paint. However, even this aspect is expanded in “Monochrome” group show. Instead of mixing paints, Hannah Quinlivan employs LEDs to create shades generating through the interaction between lights and shadows. Troy Simmons and Ye Jin-young put a stronger emphasis on what can be seen from the expressive, energetic shapes to the delicate, hand-pulled clay petals.

For press inquiries or general information, please contact the gallery office at admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

FENÊTRES DE DIEU: Park Byung-Hoon

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present FENÊTRES DE DIEU, Korean artist Park Byung-Hoon’s second solo show at the gallery, on view from May 11th – July 1st, 2017.

Park Byung-Hoon’s paintings are manifestations of the marriage between bold gestural abstraction and delicate transparency.

While at first glance, the works are reminiscent of an ethereal Mark Rothko, or a vibrant Clyfford Still, Byung-Hoon is more than a master of contemporary abstract expressionism. He is equally aligned with performance art, his work, acting like a relic of a performative action painting caught mid-stroke.

ParkByung-Hoon_TransparenceRed_2016_200x100cmByung-Hoon takes advantage of the translucence of glass to create a narrative; each layer of acrylic plexiglas revealing a different chapter to his process. Existing simultaneously as paintings and sculptures, Byung-Hoon never attempts to control his paint. Instead he allows it to drip and flow before capturing it mid-motion between layers of acrylic. The beauty of each layer fully realized. What is left is a dimensional and storied composition that melds sculpture and painting and allows the viewer to see the inside of a painting.

The contrast between his seductive and dynamic layers of vibrant color and his hard- edged and minimalistic layers of Plexiglas are inherently provocative and demanding. The viewer is confronted with this divergence before sinking slowly into the layers of Byung-Hoon’s chronicle. Byung-Hoon, coming from three generations of Pastor families, and his works, loosely inspired by stained glass windows, are sometimes viewed as windows to the soul.

Park Byung-Hoon was born in 1967. He graduated from Inchon City University, Korea. His work has been exhibited internationally. Park currently lives and works in Paris, France.

Asian Reflections

Stemming from Asian origins and residing in Europe, Korean artists Park Byung-Hoon and Keun Woo Lee allow their Western environment to influence their techniques and interpretations of the traditional landscape.

Employing paint and acrylic plexiglass, Park Byung-Hoon creates a unique synthesis of geometric and ethereal forms. Stylistically comparable to the Minimalist movement and approach of the 1960s, Byung-Hoon’s work engages the audience in an exclusive dialogue, affording viewers a singular opportunity to interpret independent from suggestion. As with the Minimalist precedent, the ever-present prospect of impossibility of interpretation exists as well, intensifying personal experience of Byung-Hoon’s work.

Capitalizing on the transparent nature of glass, Byung-Hoon is able to create elegant, dream-like abstractions. Rather than attempting to control the paint, he allows the medium to flow freely within the acrylic before capturing its progress mid-motion. Such a reductive method of creation calls attention to the materiality of the work, while simultaneously allowing the artist to focus exclusively on the hues and patterns created as a result of the process. The pronounced three-dimensionality of the acrylic glass enables Byung-Hoon to take a deliberate step away from the traditional distinction between painting and sculpture, and toward a more personal exploration of the physical nature of art as an object.

Park Byung-Hoon was born in Korea and currently lives and works in Paris, France.

Abstraction is courted, yet ultimately tempered in the work of Keun Woo Lee. Traces of figuration persist; plants, flowers, and other elemental features of landscape remain visible in Lee’s creations. These forms, however, serve as a mere framework for the “nothingness” that holds the artist’s true interest. Lee has developed a keen sensitivity for the exploration of absence’s impact on depth, successfully immersing the viewer’s attention in the concave reductions of the final image.

A classically trained landscape painter, Lee has worked with a variety of media. Her latest body of work is characterized by painted porcelain from Jingdezhen, China, known for nearly two millennia as the “porcelain capital”. The artist’s creative process is an arduous one— Lee paints, then fires, large porcelain sheets within a single kiln in order to achieve the desired aesthetic. Working quickly and intuitively, and believing corrections to be taboo, the artist’s process ensures that each brushstroke and implementation of color acts as a gestural invocation of emotion.

Keun Woo Lee was born in Korea and currently lives and works in Kiel, Germany.