ITOMARISM : Kaleidoscope

Mari Ito SOLO SHOW: ITOMARISM Kaleidoscope Oct. 18 –Dec. 1, 2018

Opening Reception Thurs. Oct. 18, 2018. The artist is present.

For press inquiries or general information: admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

Mari Ito. Untitled, 2018. Natural pigments on Japanese rice paper. 39×39 inches/100x100CM

September 28, 2018 (New York, NY) – JanKossen Contemporary is proud to present ITOMARISM:Kaleidoscope, the premiere solo show in the United States by Japanese contemporary artist Mari Ito. The exhibition will be held in New York from Oct. 18th to Dec. 1st 2018. The artist shall be present at the opening reception on Thursday, 18th Oct. between 6 – 8 pm.

Mari Ito (Tokyo, 1980, lives in Barcelona SPAIN), studied traditional Japanese painting at Joshibi University of Art and Design in Tokyo. Mari Ito’s oeuvre is based and influenced by the philosophical approaches found in Animism, Anthropocene and Animalism.

Animism finds its expression in long standing Japanese techniques where all objects, places and creatures are seen to have a spiritual existence, and are hence animated and alive. Ito’s work shows us her world that is post-human existence: when we are no longer an influential force on the environment. Her organic, alien plants affected by a nuclear disaster thrive and grow, despite humanity’s absence (or because of it).

Ito’s new work is a continuation her series entitled “The origin of Desire”, where the artist invites us to reflect on the origins of our needs; that is our most irrational and personal impulses. The Id or “das Es” (as Sigmund Freud would say) split off from the ego and the superego is the psychic – therefore the purest and most primitive expression of our drives and aspirations. The essence of what makes us “alive”.

Completely opposed forces that actually complement and react to one another are interpreted by Ito in the same way, for they have the same value and form a duality that exists in natural harmony. The Romantics pioneered the concept of the sublime, of humanity needing to succumb to the awesome force of nature, normally shown with a small figure or a person with their back turned towards the viewer, engulfed by their environment. Ito has completely excluded the figure, leaving only a representation of our base desires through personified flora.

Ito’s delicately formed creations come to life as they unfold into themselves, permanently striving to make their way towards awareness in their on-going search for the root of desire;

whatever its nature.

Mari Ito. Untitled, 2018. Natural pigments on Japanese rice paper. 38x51inches/97x130cm

About JanKossen Contemporary

JanKossen Contemporary, founded in 2009, is an international contemporary art gallery representing artists working across multiple disciplines. Its principal focus is working with artists from various countries whose diverse practices include painting, drawing, sculpture, and large scale installation. The gallery has exhibitions in New York and administration HQ in Basel, Switzerland.

MONOCHROME

Monochrome, a curated group exhibition showcasing selected artists from JanKossen Contemporary’s international program, will be on view from May 31 – July 14, 2018 with an opening reception from 6-8pm on May 31, 2018. The exhibition will feature artworks by Troy Simmons (USA), Dieter Kränzlein (Germany), Antonio Marra (Italy), Park Byung-Hoon (South Korean/France), Alex Rane (USA/Italy), Hannah Quinlivan (Australia), and Ye Jin-Young (South Korea) which explore the concept of monochromatic abstract art. An online catalogue will accompany the exhibition.TroySimmons_Evolve_2016_JanKossen

Troy Simmons. Evolve, 2016. Concrete, aluminum, acrylic. 60x36x18 inchesMonochromatic art has expanded since its inception in the early 20th century painting. The exploration of value and tonal changes are used to convey a wide variety of emotions and meaning today. Beginning in Moscow with Russian Suprematist artist Kazimir Malevich with his Black Square on a White Field (1915), monochromatic art works have seen a rapid growth, particularly in New York with the likes of abstract expressionists such as Ad Reinhardt in the 50s, to minimalism with artists such as Agnes Martin and Frank Stella in the 60s. Monochrome continues this tradition and pushes the boundaries of not only the physical materials used, but the range of emotions that they are able to express.

HannahQuinlivan_It started with a spark, 2017. 35x46x7in_88x116x18cm. LED light and anodised aluminium.

Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with a Spark, 2017. LED light and anodized aluminum. 60x36x18 inches

The abstraction of form, however, does not equal a simplification of thought. By removing the chromatic range of an object, the artist encourages the viewer to fully absorb the subtle nuances in surface texture and shade, as seen in Troy Simmons’ mixed media works, as well as Alex Rane and Dieter Kränzlein’s marble sculptures. Even comparing two monochromatic abstracted sculptures, the viewer is presented with two radically different works, from the geometric abstractions of Kränzlein to the surreal abstracted figures of Alex Rane. Without the distraction of colors, viewers are also able to see the subtle surface quality as well as the artists’ application and control of materials. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly colored geometric works, Antonio Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of unexpected color in an otherwise monochromatic piece.

Black and white are not true colors, but shades meant to distinguish tonal value. Traditionally these shades were made by using paint. However, even this aspect is expanded in “Monochrome” group show. Instead of mixing paints, Hannah Quinlivan employs LEDs to create shades generating through the interaction between lights and shadows. Troy Simmons and Ye Jin-young put a stronger emphasis on what can be seen from the expressive, energetic shapes to the delicate, hand-pulled clay petals.

For press inquiries or general information, please contact the gallery office at admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.