MONOCHROME

Monochrome, a curated group exhibition showcasing selected artists from JanKossen Contemporary’s international program, will be on view from May 31 – July 14, 2018 with an opening reception from 6-8pm on May 31, 2018. The exhibition will feature artworks by Troy Simmons (USA), Dieter Kränzlein (Germany), Antonio Marra (Italy), Park Byung-Hoon (South Korean/France), Alex Rane (USA/Italy), Hannah Quinlivan (Australia), and Ye Jin-Young (South Korea) which explore the concept of monochromatic abstract art. An online catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

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Troy Simmons. Evolve, 2016. Concrete, aluminum, acrylic. 60x36x18 inches

Monochromatic art has expanded since its inception in the early 20th century painting. The exploration of value and tonal changes are used to convey a wide variety of emotions and meaning today. Beginning in Moscow with Russian Suprematist artist Kazimir Malevich with his Black Square on a White Field (1915), monochromatic art works have seen a rapid growth, particularly in New York with the likes of abstract expressionists such as Ad Reinhardt in the 50s, to minimalism with artists such as Agnes Martin and Frank Stella in the 60s. Monochrome continues this tradition and pushes the boundaries of not only the physical materials used, but the range of emotions that they are able to express.

HannahQuinlivan_It started with a spark, 2017. 35x46x7in_88x116x18cm. LED light and anodised aluminium.
Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with a Spark, 2017. LED light and anodized aluminum. 60x36x18 inches

The abstraction of form, however, does not equal a simplification of thought. By removing the chromatic range of an object, the artist encourages the viewer to fully absorb the subtle nuances in surface texture and shade, as seen in Troy Simmons’ mixed media works, as well as Alex Rane and Dieter Kränzlein’s marble sculptures. Even comparing two monochromatic abstracted sculptures, the viewer is presented with two radically different works, from the geometric abstractions of Kränzlein to the surreal abstracted figures of Alex Rane. Without the distraction of colors, viewers are also able to see the subtle surface quality as well as the artists’ application and control of materials. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly colored geometric works, Antonio Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of unexpected color in an otherwise monochromatic piece.

Black and white are not true colors, but shades meant to distinguish tonal value. Traditionally these shades were made by using paint. However, even this aspect is expanded in “Monochrome” group show. Instead of mixing paints, Hannah Quinlivan employs LEDs to create shades generating through the interaction between lights and shadows. Troy Simmons and Ye Jin-young put a stronger emphasis on what can be seen from the expressive, energetic shapes to the delicate, hand-pulled clay petals.

For press inquiries or general information, please contact the gallery office at admin@jankossen.com or call at 631-903-5564.

impulses, restraints, tones: New Compositions by Hannah Quinlivan

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present impulses, restraints, tones an exhibition by Australian contemporary artist, Hannah Quinlivan. impulses, restraints, tones is the artist’s first exhibition in New York and will be on view from March 1 – April 20, 2018 with an opening reception on March 1 from 6-8pm.

 

Hannah Quinlivan. Holdfast, 2017. Steel and PVC, 185 x 75 x8 inches.
Best known for her work within the movement of experimental drawing, Quinlivan expands upon the medium to create drawings that employ wire, steel, salt, yarn, shadow, and LED light, constantly evolving and dissecting the elements of a drawing to investigate the confines of the line itself. Twisted wire structures are the basis for her shadow drawings, which Quinlivan later develops further into sculptures; 2D drawings turn into 3D drawings, that are then turned back into 2D drawings. With a deep commitment to the exploration of and innate response to her materials, Quinlivan composes lyrical artworks that stitch together a response to the passing of time. Each element of the work is endlessly translated into an infinite looping web; traveling through our consciousness and drawing attention to the subjectivity of the phenomena of recollection and forgetting.
Hannah Quinlivan. Swallowed by the Sky, 2017. Acrylic and Indian ink on linen, 83 x 73 inches.
impulses, restraints, tones exhibits brand new “Spatial Drawings,” as well as two delicate, yet powerful, site-specific and interactive installations that respond to the gallery space and flux of bodies within it. The well-known “Spatial Drawings” walk the line between sculptural weaving and graphic mark making and explores concepts of temporal reality and memory. Quinlivan’s “Spatial Drawings” performance develops from wire armatures suspended from the ceiling. The shadows of these wire armatures are the basis for Quinlivan’s live and in-person crystalline salt drawings that will be developed over the course of three weeks during exhibition. This work, shown for the first time in New York City, forms part of a series of site-specific ephemeral drawings Quinlivan has been making in Cambridge, Berlin, Hong Kong, Australia, and Colorado from since 2016.
Hannah Quinlivan. It Started with A Spark, 2017. LED light and anodised aluminium, 35 x 46 x 7 inches.
Curator Marguerite Brown, explains “Linear threads and their manipulation have for millennia been symbolically connected to notions of time. The Moirai of ancient Greek mythology, also known at the Fates, were three goddesses who through the act of spinning thread with distaff and spindle, controlled the life of every person from birth to death, when their thread was abruptly cut. Similar female deities exist in Roman, Norse and Slavic mythologies, where thread is consistently wielded as a manifestation of destiny. As such, a simple strand and the way it is stretched, allotted and truncated, became an ancient way of comprehending the movement of a human life through time.”
ABOUT HANNAH QUINLIVAN
Hannah Quinlivan, named by BMA Magazine as one of the Six Canberra Artists to watch in 2018, was a finalist for the 2014 Alice Prize and has received such prestigious accolades as the Canberra Critic Circle Award, Shire of East Pilbara Residency Award, Cox Prize, Don Moffat & Cecilia Ng award, People’s Choice Award, Megalo Print Studio and Gallery Residency Award, and the Jan Brown Drawing Prize. She has exhibited major presentations at Canberra Museum and Art Gallery, Canberra; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Cambridge University, London, Pembroke College, Cambridge; Deakin University, Melbourne; The Hong Kong Harbourfront, Hong Kong; and Kuala Lumpur Biennale, National Art Gallery of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. She is in such prestigious public collections as National Gallery of Australia, Gregory Allicar Museum, The Australian High Commission (Singapore), Philip Cox Collection, Deakin University, The Australian National University, KPMG Art Collection, Gaw Capital collection, Colorado State University, Megalo Print Studio + Gallery, Shire of East Pilbara, Ormond College Collection. She was recently selected by the curators of Urban Art Projects to create a major public art commission where her work will be featured on the glazed screen of every platform of the Canberra Light Rail network.

UnBreakable – Ceramics Redefined

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present UNBREAKABLE: CERAMICS REDEFINED, an exhibition of figurative and figurative abstract contemporary ceramics with work by Penny Byrne, Kathy Stecko, Claire Curneen, Cathy Lewis, and Keun Woo Lee.

The connotations surrounding the medium of ceramic have historically been associated with concepts of craft and vessel. This exhibition however, brings together five contemporary artists who break down these confines to create haunting, political, religious, and poignant sculptures. Their historical consequences, contemporary conceptualism and social relevance, adhere to and break historical molds of craft while standing on the forefront of trends in contemporary sculpture.

Australian artist Penny Byrne’s sculptural works are politically charged, highly engaging and often disarmingly humorous. Using materials such as porcelain figurines, bronze, glass, vintage and found objects, Byrne’s work presents an ongoing inquiry into popular culture and international politics. Though the themes of her work are dark and heavy, the lightness and treatment of the porcelain contrasts this, formulating a new perception of these themes.

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Penny Byrne. Putin’s Poodle, 2017. Trump bobble head, antique porcelain figurine, epoxy resin, enamel paints, 13 x 4 x 4 inches.

Kathy Stecko’s humanoid porcelain sculptures resemble a party thrown at a haunted circus.  The elongated yet truncated limbs recall elements of 16th century mannerism, while the bulging bellies and hallow eyes resemble the psychological undertones of an Edvard Munch. These tiny sculptures hang on the wall or stand on their own pedestals to create tiny clusters of figures both affecting and endearing. Stecko lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

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Kathy Stecko. Fracture, 2017. Porcelain, 14.5 x 3.5 x 3 inches.

UK-based artist Claire Curneen’s androgynous figures have always been a convergence of art history, ceramic history, and religious symbolism. Her single standing modeled figures, serve as a developed response to traditional ceramic objects such as the standing Vase, however draw upon medieval and renaissance approaches to depicting the human figure in painting. Often also referencing Medici Blue, Dutch pottery, or Japanese ceramics in her work, you will also often find gold fingers and lips recalling the important Japanese tradition of Kintsugi – the art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum. Taking one step further, Curneen often comments on religious concerns such as symbolic references to Christ, biblical interpretations, concepts of soul, and questions of mortality.

Claire Curneen_Untitled 1 (Bird Figure) _2017_28.25x8.75x8in detail 2
Claire Curneen. Untitled 1 (Bird Figure), 2017. Ceramic, 28.25 x 8.75 x 8 inches.

Cathy Lewis, trained at the Glasgow School of Art, Falmouth School of Art and The University of the West of England, is most known for her beautifully modelled life-sized figures of children with strong urban or tribal identities. Her work is concerned with ideas about culture, social history and self, and she often combines several ideas into one piece each influencing each other and asking and answering questions. Lewis’ work examines the importance of a cultural heritage and how this may be learnt and shared. Encouraging her audience to examine links between the past and the future, her works call into question how the future is consistently propped up by the past.

JanKossen ContemporaryUnBreakable - Ceramics RedefinedJanuary 11, 2018
Cathy Lewis. Mainly Porcelain I (Left) and Mainly Porcelain II (Right), 2017. Ceramic, 47 x 14 x 6.5 inches.

Figurative abstraction is courted, yet ultimately tempered in the work of Keun Woo Lee. Traces of plants, flowers, and other elemental features of landscape remain visible in Lee’s creations. These forms, however, serve as a mere framework for the “nothingness” that holds the artist’s true interest. Lee has developed a keen sensitivity for the exploration of absence’s impact on depth, successfully immersing the viewer’s attention in the concave reductions of the final image. Keun Woo Lee was born in Korea and currently lives and works in Kiel, Germany.

Keun Woo Lee. Wave Series, 2015-2017. Glazed stoneware.

For questions or more information, please contact Karen Gilbert at Karen.gilbert@jankossen.com or at 631-903-5564.

YE JIN YOUNG “WAVES AND WINDS”

Ye Jin-Young, Wind. I feel a space of mind VIII, 2017. 78.7 x 47.2 in, Clay and mixed material.

Ye Jin-Young is inspired by the concept of a ‘life force’ or ‘energy flow’, otherwise known as Qi. He creates his works by way of intuition, tracing memory and his own stream of consciousness to develop delicate, swirling patterns reminiscent of those found in the natural environment. The gentle repetition conceives a sense of spirituality as Jin-Young conjures landscapes of petals that seem otherworldly and yet comforting.

Detail shot of Wind. I feel a space of mind VIII.

Jin-Young works to convey nature’s wondrous yet simple patterns in an equally delicate means by gently pulling and molding by hand, most often, virgin porcelain petal-like elements until they form a flowing piece of tapestry like wall art. Using the themes of wind, flower and water waves as focal point, he forces viewers to move with his works.

Bruno Walpoth “Insight”

BRUNO Walpoth, The Seeker (left) and The Timid One (right)

Bruno Walpoth is an Italian sculptor who’s wooden, cardboard, and bronze sculptures are caught in a moment — stagnant, while also exposed and carrying the impression of vulnerability. His sculptures are honest in appearance, silently asserting their presence and commanding the space around them. Though paralyzed, these forms continue to build on the meditative tone of the exhibition, immersing the observer in a sensitive encounter.

Bruno Walpoth “Insight” and Ye Jin Young “Waves and Winds”

Bruno Walpoth “Insight” and Ye Jin Young “Waves and Winds”

Bruno Walpoth is an Italian sculptor who’s wooden, cardboard, and bronze sculptures are caught in a moment — stagnant, while also exposed and carrying the impression of vulnerability. His sculptures are honest in appearance, silently asserting their presence and commanding the space around them. Though paralyzed, these forms continue to build on the meditative tone of the exhibition, immersing the observer in a sensitive encounter.

In contrast to Walpoth’s motionless works, Ye Jin-Young is inspired by the concept of a ‘life force’ or ‘energy flow’, otherwise known as Qi. He creates his works by way of intuition, tracing memory and his own stream of consciousness to develop delicate, swirling patterns reminiscent of those found in the natural environment. The gentle repetition conceives a sense of spirituality as Jin-Young conjures landscapes of petals that seem otherworldly and yet comforting.

Though working with different mediums, the two exhibiting artists share in creating, not only an intimately meditative experience for the viewer, but in their creative process as well. Walpoth’s works range in medium from clay to bronze, but he shows a fondness for working with wood. His use of carving tools to carefully perfect details on such a delicate medium provide his sculptures with the appearance of skin-like properties. Jin-Young works to convey nature’s wondrous yet simple patterns in an equally delicate means by gently pulling and molding by hand, most often, virgin porcelain petal-like elements until they form a flowing piece of tapestry like wall art. Using the themes of wind, flower and water waves as focal point, he forces viewers to move with his works.

MAGIA DEL MOMENTO: Antonio Marra

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present MAGIA DEL MOMENTO, Antonio Marra’s premiere solo show at the gallery, on view from September 7th to October 14th, 2017.

Antonio Marra’s 3D paintings are simultaneously familiar and revolutionary. Although nostalgic of Frank Stella’s vibrantly coloured geometric works, Marra further enhances the experience of abstraction by injecting a shock of the unexpected.

Antonio Marra, Das Geheimniss der letzten Rille (left view, front view, and right view), 2016

59 x 59 x 1 inches

Using precise mathematical calculations, Marra introduces sculptural features that elevate his paintings. His masterful craftsmanship is evident in the thick, precisely painted grooves formed entirely by the artist’s own hand. Walking alongside the work allows the dynamic energy of the optical illusion to manifest. The observer has to move from one side of the painting to the other, otherwise they’re only seeing a fraction of Marra’s artistry.

The exhibition is a kaleidoscopic experience; Marra affects the audience’s perception of depth by manipulating colour, shape, and form. His works are provocative as they present a challenge, awakening curiosity and inspiring interaction. His lenticulars demonstrate conflict, briefly offering a moment of rigidity and certainty through distinct geometric patterns that are then disrupted, undergoing a metamorphosis that can only be initiated by the spectator.

Antonio Marra was born in Italy and has lived in Germany for many years. He has exhibited in Germany and throughout Europe since the early 1990s. Recently, his work has been shown in the United States. Marra’s works are on view in public collections including the Museum Explora Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany and the Ritter Museum Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany.

Novum Spatium: Dieter Balzer and Dirk Salz

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Novum Spatium, a two-person show featuring German based artists Dirk Salz and Dieter Balzer, on view from March 16th to May 6th, 2017.

Novum Spatium, meaning New Space, explores the concept of perception in relation to our environment, physical space and one’s interaction within it.

Dieter Balzer, translates these ideas through pristine geometric abstraction, creating sculptural, minimalist form that deal with depth and negative space. Bright, intricate and overlapping; the complex elements built upon each other, carry the viewer’s eyes over and through an endless, looping playground of planes.

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Elements of Balzer’s work run parallel to contemporary influences on graphic, industrial, and architectural design. The flatness of the vibrantly colored foils create a contemporary twist on the theories of non-representational neoplasticism, cubist sculpture and the Japanese Superflat movement.

Where Balzer uses 3-dimensional elements, the work of Dirk Salz approaches these concepts from another perspective. Instead of creating physical depth with his work, Salz toys with the impression of it. Salz’s uses simple, Supremacist compositions that seem to echo with their color transparency and smooth surfaces.

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These highly reflective pieces confront the viewer with their own image, and present an experience of shifting planes, and varying depths. Surrounding elements found within the work’s environment emerge and are mirrored as one moves back and forth between the self and the work.

Like John McLaughlin’s Light and Space movement, the works invoke a sense of temporality within one’s perception like a Robert Irwin or James Turrel installation; reinventing the world around us.

Together, the two artists create a visual dialogue that is crisp, energetic and articulate. Moving between the two bodies of work invokes a sense of moving between worlds, one that brightly invokes the geometric quality of architecture and the digital world that is so familiar to us, while the other allows us to reflect on the quality of space and our place within it.

Dieter Balzer studied at the Universities of Heidelberg and Chesterfield College of Art. His work can be viewed across Germany at the Stern-Wywiol Galerie in Hamburg and the Galerie Corona Unger in Bremen, Germany; and has previously shown across the United States and Canada. He currently lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Dirk Salz studied at RWTH in Aachen, Germany and lives and works in Mulheim an der Ruhr. Exhibitions include public institutions such as the Museum Katharinenhof, Kranenburg, Kunstmuseum Mülheim/Ruhr, Germany and has shown with various international galleries and art fairs.

Building Mountains: First Solo Show of Minjung Kim

JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Building Mountains, Minjung Kim’s first Solo Show in New York, opening on 2 February, 2017 and on view through 11 March, 2017.

The work of Kim demonstrates her foundation in the traditional Korean calligraphic arts as well as the influence of mid-20th Century abstract expressionism, both of which celebrate the ability to convey energy and spirit through the manipulation of line and practiced spontaneity. Her artworks make use of small torn pieces of HaKimMinjung-Building Forest15_19, 165x130cm,2015.JPGnji, a traditional handmade paper from Korea, as well as ink and paint in a sculptural capacity creating the illusion of dimensionality, geometric form, and architectural minimalism.

Her work explores the expressive potential of pure material. The tone of her work is often at once contemplative and whimsical, ethereal and scientific. It moves onlookers to consider man’s place in nature and our relationships to each other.

She is hesitant to label her work as art — rather she describes her practice as a “discipline of life,” a meditative process which simultaneously requires her to focus her energy and to clear her mind.

Kim obtained her MFA and PhD at Seoul National University. She has been widely exhibited with exhibitions at such prestigious institutions as Danwon Museum of Art, Shangshang Museum of Art, Seoul Art Center, Bunan Museum of Art, Namsong Museum of Art, and Hanwan Museum of Art. She has won countless awards and honors including the 2004 Dong-A Art Prize, 20th Kyungin Great Art Prize, and the 7th Nahyseuk Women Art Prize. She currently lives and works in Korea.

Behind The Glass First Solo Show of Michael Burges

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JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present Behind The Glass, Michael Burges’ premier Solo Show in New York, opening on 20 October, 2016 and on view through 28 January, 2017. This exhibit showcases Burges’ most recent works from his Reverse Glass Paintings series, which he has been working on since 2009. Employing a unique technique of reverse glass painting with gold and platinum leaf, Burges creates large works with an extraordinary color presence, aesthetic precision and visual impact.

In his most recent series Reverse Glass Paintings, Burges uses plexiglass instead of canvas to create a “window” to an alternative reality, and bends the rules of traditional painting techniques. Using a multi-layering process, Burges freely plays with combinations of colors, experimenting with various methods of applying paint with rags and sponges; for his backgrounds the artists uses precious metals including platinum, copper and gold leaf.

What the viewer sees is an abstract painting, free of pre-conceptions – the viewer is invited to freely interpret the art – Burges hence invites us to an open, non-verbal dialogue.

Burges has been exploring the possibilities of color, space, their relationship as well as the effect it produces on the viewer and vice versa since 1983. His approach to painting is often described as a ‘science of art’, comparable to the visual expression of scientific laws and hypothesis. There is however a spiritual quality to his work, embodying elements of Buddhism principles, suggesting the influence of the artist’s background in Comparative Religions, Ethnology and Indiology.

Michael Burges was born in Duesseldorf, Germany in 1954. He currently lives and works in Dusseldorf and Italy. He attended Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf, where he studies social sciences. Shortly thereafter he studied Comparative Religions, Ethnology and Indology at Friedrich-Wilhelms-University Bonn, Germany. Burges began painting in 1981 and is influenced by American Painter Douglas Swan. In 1983 he became engrossed in the style of abstract painting that has persisted as his method of expression through to the present. JanKossen Contemporary has chosen to showcase his work as it reflects strongly upon the aesthetic and conceptual intentions of the gallery.

He has had installations spanning internationally, including exhibitions in Paris, Belgium, Munich, Los Angeles, and Miami.